Texas Is Changing

We expect easy access to clean drinking water every day. Reliable electricity 24/7. Clean air, a stable economy, and a safe place to live. These are critical for healthy, thriving communities. Take any one of these away, and our wellbeing and livelihoods can deteriorate quickly.

But in Texas and elsewhere, the looming realities of rapid population growth and weather intensity mean that the things we rely on to live — water, energy, dependable infrastructure, and an ecosystem to support them — are under unprecedented risk.

Here’s why: Texas’ population today is nearly 28 million. By 2050, that number is predicted to double to 55 million, with most people clustered in already-dense urban centers like Dallas-Fort Worth, Houston, San Antonio, and Austin. Limited resources will be in even greater demand.

Add to that the environmental stress from prolonged droughts, record-breaking heat waves, and destructive floods, and what we have won’t be enough.

That’s our current trajectory, but we can still change course.

Planet Texas 2050 is an eight-year sprint to find solutions that will make our communities more resilient and better prepared. To do that, we’re bringing together architects, archaeologists, city planners, public health experts, geologists, engineers, computer scientists, artists — and more.

Just as important, what we discover will have applications that extend far beyond our region. We’ll share our findings, tools, and processes with researchers across the U.S. and the world who are facing similar challenges in the 21st century.

 


 

Our Goal: Sustaining Critical Resources

Without essentials like water and energy, the systems we rely on — infrastructure to move goods and people, dependable emergency services, and more — will fail. Our ability to sustain those critical resources at levels that can support massive population growth and climatic shifts is in jeopardy.

Planet Texas 2050 researchers are committed to developing programs and policy recommendations that will improve Texas’ adaptability and build its resilience. To do that, their work will focus on understanding the interconnectedness of four critical resource systems.

Water

How much water do we have, where is it, and how do we get it? Texas has made great strides when it comes to assessing questions of water availability, but we still don’t have all the answers. Our team will consider several water challenges, from measuring water availability today to reconstructing the region’s paleoclimate. Integrating new data will provide a better understanding of Texas’ future.

Energy

We use energy — oil, natural gas, coal, wind, solar, and nuclear power — to move people and commerce, power lights, and heat and cool homes. As populations grow, the mix of energy sources will have to change to meet demand while staying affordable and minimizing environmental harm. Our work will focus on gaining a comprehensive understanding of the state’s energy sources and production capabilities.

Urbanization

Texas’ urban centers will undergo a population explosion in the next 30 years. Unaddressed, this will further exacerbate environmental and health problems, traffic congestion, and affordability. We must better manage water distribution, improve transportation planning, increase the prevalence of energy-efficient construction, and mitigate traffic-related air pollution.

Ecosystem Services

Healthy ecosystems are critical. They give us crop pollination and shade, water filtration and natural carbon sequestration. But as Texas’ population grows and droughts and floods become more severe, the resources our lands provide will be threatened. Our researchers will map Texas’ most vulnerable areas and study what effects population growth and weather extremes have on the ecosystem services we rely on.

 

Solving a Challenge, One Project at a Time

To address the most urgent issues affecting our region, Planet Texas 2050 is conducting new research, launching educational programs, and partnering with organizations and community groups throughout the state.

Optimal Averaging of Water Resources

Optimal Averaging of Water Resources

Planet Texas 2050 hydrologists and geologists will attempt to answer important questions about the water cycle in Texas: How much water is actually in Texas, and what methods are best … Keep reading

Texas Metro Observatory

Texas Metro Observatory

Planet Texas 2050 researchers will build a communication and data platform focused on economic, environmental, health, demographic, and governmental information for each of the state’s metropolitan regions. The Texas Metro … Keep reading

Population Dynamics in Premodern Societies

Population Dynamics in Premodern Societies

While the rise of mega-cities is a modern trend, urban centers also played an important role in past societies, and these ancient cities encountered many of the challenges we face … Keep reading

Texas Water Stories: Local Narratives of Hydrologic Change and Adaptation

Texas Water Stories: Local Narratives of Hydrologic Change and Adaptation

Planet Texas 2050 scientists will be measuring, mapping, and studying water sources throughout the state. At the same time, our researchers will be talking with communities in three key regions … Keep reading

Artist-in-Residence: Lorenz Graybelt

Artist-in-Residence: Lorenz Graybelt

Sculptor and performance artist Marie Lorenz will design a video map of the water that flows down Texas’ Colorado River — one of the state’s primary water sources — into … Keep reading

Urban Watershed Evolution

Urban Watershed Evolution

Watersheds — the area of drainage where all water collects to a given stream — serve as microcosms and give scientists unique insights into how climate changes and urban development … Keep reading

DataX

DataX

DataX is the first of its kind and underscores all of Planet Texas 2050. It’s a next generation integrated data analytics platform designed by experts and powered by the supercomputers … Keep reading

Transportation-Related Air Pollutants and Health

Transportation-Related Air Pollutants and Health

As cities become more densely populated, people will be forced to live in very close proximity to highways, which will increase their exposure to transportation-related air pollution. Proximity to these … Keep reading

Blue Index

Blue Index

Blue Index is a participatory research project designed to gather feedback about 33 waterscapes throughout Austin. Led by Kevin Jeffery, a graduate student in landscape architecture, Blue Index focuses on … Keep reading

Code@TACC

Code@TACC

The Texas Advanced Computing Center hosts a series of free summer camps each year high school students. This past summer, TACC introduced Code@TACC Connected, which taught students how to use … Keep reading

Scientist-in-Residence

Scientist-in-Residence

This program, designed by UT’s Environmental Science Institute, brings current UT graduate student experts into a local teachers’ classrooms to help them develop new, engaging activities and lesson plans that … Keep reading

Graduate Seminars and Project-Based Courses

Graduate Seminars and Project-Based Courses

Planet Texas 2050 faculty lead graduate classes that are open to master’s and Ph.D.-level students across all schools and departments at UT. These courses delve into concepts and issues central … Keep reading

Austin Metro Listening Tour

Austin Metro Listening Tour

Before embarking on research of this scale, graduate students, under the direction of research chair Katherine Lieberknecht, spent several months meeting with city and county officials around central Texas. Their … Keep reading

ACDDC Partnership

ACDDC Partnership

Planet Texas 2050 is partnering with the Austin Community Design and Development Center (ACDDC) to create a solutions-driven community center. Our pilot project will be a place where knowledge and … Keep reading

Team Members

UT’s first grand challenge brings together researchers from 14 colleges, schools, and units across campus, a number that is expected to grow as more projects are added each year.

Read full bioJay Banner

Jay Banner

ProfessorGeological Sciences

My research explores Earth surface processes, including climate and hydrologic processes. Much of that focuses on the study of cave deposits, carbonate rocks, and modern aquifers and watersheds.

Read full bioHeather Houser

Heather Houser

Associate ProfessorEnglish

My background is in English literary studies, and my research focuses on how contemporary literature and visual culture contribute to how we understand and respond to environmental crises.

Read full bioFernanda Leite

Fernanda Leite

Associate ProfessorCivil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

My research and teaching interests include building and civil information modeling and collaboration and coordination technologies, project management and economics, and construction safety.

Read full bioKatherine Lieberknecht

Katherine Lieberknecht

Assistant ProfessorSchool of Architecture

I study how ecosystems support cities and the residents living within them. My work focuses on urban water planning, metropolitan-scaled green infrastructure planning, and metropolitan food systems.

Read full bioSuzanne Pierce

Suzanne Pierce

Research ScientistTexas Advanced Computing Center

I’m a trained groundwater scientist, and I lead an NSF-funded effort to apply artificial intelligence and knowledge-centered computing to solve complex Earth resource problems.

Read full bioAdam Rabinowitz

Adam Rabinowitz

Associate ProfessorClassics

I study the interplay between individuals’ daily lives and the unfolding of larger, historical processes — and on the interdisciplinary research methods necessary to connect the two.

Read full bioLourdes Rodríguez

Lourdes Rodríguez

DirectorCenter for Place-Based Initiatives

My work focuses on community health outside the traditional health system, especially on inviting people from multiple sectors to contribute to solving local problems with local ideas and resources.

Read full bioMichael Young

Michael Young

Associate DirectorBureau of Economic Geology

My focus is on environmental geosciences, with an emphasis on soil, water, and managing ecosystem resources to avoid shortages, particularly in arid and semi-arid regions of the U.S.

Lourdes Rodríguez

Associate ProfessorPopulation Health

Kerry Kinney

ProfessorCivil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Justin Thompson

Graduate Student ResearcherJackson School of Geosciences / LBJ School of Public Affairs

Bridget Scanlon

HydrogeologistBureau of Economic Geology

Emily Pease

HydrogeologistUSGS Texas Water Science Center

Corinne Wong

Research ScientistEnvironmental Science Institute

Jim Walker

DirectorUT Office of Sustainability

Allan Shearer

Associate ProfessorSchool of Architecture

Mateo Scoggins

Environmental ScientistCity of Austin Watershed Protection Department

Timothy Riedel

Clinical Assistant ProfessorCollege of Natural Sciences

Daniella Rempe

Assistant ProfessorGeological Sciences

Stuart Reichler

Sr. LecturerCollege of Natural Sciences

Mary Poteet

Research FellowIntegrative Biology

Ashley Matheny

Assistant ProfessorGeological Sciences

Mary Jo Kirisits

Associate ProfessorCivil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Shalene Jha

Associate ProfessorIntegrative Biology

Christopher Herrington

Environmental EngineerCity of Austin Watershed Protection Department

Norma Fowler

ProfessorIntegrative Biology

Kasey Faust

Assistant ProfessorCivil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Bryan Black

Associate ProfessorMarine Science

Amy Belaire

Landscape EcologistThe Nature Conservancy

Michael Young

Associate DirectorBureau of Economic Geology

Muhammad Shaikh

Research Engineering ScientistGeological Sciences

Kelly Raley

ProfessorSociology

Suzanne Pierce

Research ScientistTexas Advanced Computing Center

Daniel Hardesty Lewis

Graduate Student ResearcherTexas Advanced Computing Center

Siva Kulasekaran

Research AssociateTexas Advanced Computing Center

Tim Keitt

ProfessorIntegrative Biology

Christopher Jordan

Research Engineering ScientistTexas Advanced Computing Center

Craig Jansen

GUI DeveloperTexas Advanced Computing Center

Dawn Hunter

Sr. Outreach Program CoordinatorTexas Advanced Computing Center

Natalie Freed

ResearcherTexas Advanced Computing Center

Charlie Dey

Portal and Gateway DeveloperTexas Advanced Computing Center

Joonyee Chuah

Sr. Outreach Program CoordinatorTexas Advanced Computing Center

Fikile Nxumalo

Assistant ProfessorCurriculum & Instruction

Ming Zhang

Associate ProfessorSchool of Architecture

Gian-Claudia Sciara

Assistant ProfessorSchool of Architecture

Lea Hildebrandt Ruiz

Assistant ProfessorChemical Engineering

Atila Novoselac

ProfessorCivil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Elizabeth Matsui

Director of Clinical and Translational ResearchPopulation Health

Elena McDonald-Buller

Sr. Research EngineerCenter for Energy and Environmental Resources

Stephen Boyles

Associate ProfessorCivil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Marie Lorenz

Artist-in-ResidenceArt and Art History

Neil Crain

Research ScientistCenter for Energy and Environmental Resources

Heather Houser

Associate ProfessorEnglish

Dennis Wylie

Research ScientistCenter for Biomedical Research Support

Fred Valdez

ProfessorAnthropology

Rabun Taylor

ProfessorClassics

David Stuart

ProfessorArt and Art History

Christy Schirmer

Assistant InstructorClassics

Astrid Runggaldier

Assistant DirectorThe Mesoamerica Center

Adam Rabinowitz

Associate ProfessorClassics

Jane Millar

Graduate Student ResearcherClassics

Angelina Jean Locker

Graduate Student ResearcherAnthropology

Jonathan Jarvis

Associate DirectorTexas Archeological Research Laboratory

Johann Hofmann

ProfessorIntegrative Biology

Benjamin Gregg

Associate ProfessorGovernment

Elijah Camille Fleming

Graduate Student ResearcherClassics

Leila Donn

Graduate Student ResearcherGeography and the Environment

Alicia Danze

Graduate Student ResearcherGeography and the Environment

Sheryl Luzzadder-Beach

ProfessorGeography and the Environment

Timothy Beach

ProfessorGeography and the Environment

Deborah Bolnick

Associate ProfessorAnthropology

Jay Banner

ProfessorGeological Sciences

Clare Zutz

Graduate Student ResearcherSchool of Architecture

Alvaro Zilveti

Graduate Student ResearcherCivil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Sarah Wu

Program CoordinatorCenter for Sustainable Development

Rachel Thomas

Graduate Student ResearcherSchool of Architecture

Steven Richter

Graduate Student ResearcherSchool of Architecture

Emmanuel Pozzer

Graduate Student ResearcherCivil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Jose Ng Osorio

Graduate Student ResearcherSchool of Architecture

Michael Oden

Associate ProfessorSchool of Architecture

Katherine Lieberknecht

Assistant ProfessorSchool of Architecture

Fernanda Leite

Associate ProfessorCivil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Margaret Fitzgerald

Graduate Student ResearcherLBJ School of Public Affairs

Juliana Felkner

Assistant ProfessorSchool of Architecture

Kristin Donaldson

Graduate Student ResearcherSchool of Architecture

C.J. Alvarez

Assistant ProfessorMexican American and Latina/o Studies

Paul Adams

ProfessorGeography and the Environment

Joshua Apte

Assistant ProfessorCivil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering / Population Health

Patrick Bixler

Assistant Professor of PracticeLBJ School of Public Affairs

Deanna Penning

Associate Professor, Geological SciencesUT El Paso

James Famiglietti

Director, Global Institute for Water SecurityUniversity of Saskatchewan

Lois Takahashi

Professor Emeritus, Urban Planning and Asian American StudiesUCLA

Elizabeth Sall

FounderUrbanLabs, LLC

Sheila Olmstead

Professor, Public AffairsUT Austin

Ruth Mostern

Associate Professor, HistoryUniversity of Pittsburgh

Vipin Kumar

Professor, Computer Science & EngineeringUniversity of Minnesota

Dave Dzombak

Professor, Civil & Environmental EngineeringCarnegie Mellon University

Richard Corsi

Dean, Maseeh College of Engineering & Computer SciencePortland State University

Joni Adamson

Professor, English and Environmental HumanitiesArizona State University

News & Events

Our World Is Changing. Our Water Infrastructure Should, Too.October 29, 2018

Our World Is Changing. Our Water Infrastructure Should, Too.

We need a more nimble and nuanced approach to urban water management, and not only because of climate change and growing urban populations, but because many communities urgently need to address failing infrastructure systems.

Water for Texas Conference 2019January 23, 20198:00amAT&T Executive Education and Conference Center

Water for Texas Conference 2019

The 2019 Water for Texas conference will be held at the AT&T Executive Education & Conference Center in Austin, Texas. The conference will begin with a Welcome Reception, followed by a day and a half of educational sessions. All meals, daily coffee, and snack breaks on January 24 and 25 are included in the registration fee.
Can We Leave it All Behind?October 19, 2018

Can We Leave it All Behind?

Not all past civilizations vanished died when the climate changed — they moved. But could we do the same, and where would we go?

Sustainability Brings Grad Students TogetherOctober 18, 2018

Sustainability Brings Grad Students Together

Planet Texas 2050 researcher Steven Richter, from the School of Architecture, joined graduate students from around campus in October for Sustainability Week. His work is part of the Texas Metro Observatory. “What does urbanization mean across Texas? We are looking at interdisciplinary questions, like how socio-economic patterns or changes in the built environment affect municipal water or energy use across the state.”

After Harvey, Texas Must Build Preparedness into Everything We Do  — TogetherAugust 22, 2018

After Harvey, Texas Must Build Preparedness into Everything We Do  — Together

Real hurricane preparedness — the kind that not only saves lives but also preserves livelihoods — is something that’s built into our cities, settlements, roads, and infrastructure.

Addressing the Interconnected Issues of Energy SprawlAugust 22, 2018

Addressing the Interconnected Issues of Energy Sprawl

We live in an energy intensive society. Quality of life and quality of our communities depend on access to energy.

Extreme Summer: Speaking the Many Languages of Climate ChangeJuly 9, 2018

Extreme Summer: Speaking the Many Languages of Climate Change

The dominant languages of climate change have been scientific, technological and economic, but art and literature get to the root of the beliefs and values that shape human behavior.

After Harvey, Texans Must Build Preparedness into Everything We DoJuly 1, 2018

After Harvey, Texans Must Build Preparedness into Everything We Do

“Demographers expect Texas’s population to double by 2050. To accommodate that growth, existing cities will be forced to increase density in their urban cores, spread out, or a combination of both.”

Something’s in Our AirJune 25, 2018

Something’s in Our Air

Texas’s changing future means the air we breathe in our homes could change as well.

How Much Water Is in Texas?June 15, 2018

How Much Water Is in Texas?

June 17th is World Day to Combat Desertification and Drought, but that could be most days in parts of Texas and the southwestern U.S.

Richard Corsi Named Engineering Dean at Portland State UniversityJune 12, 2018

Richard Corsi Named Engineering Dean at Portland State University

Planet Texas 2050 lead researcher has been named the next dean of Portland State University’s Maseeh College of Engineering and Computer Science. He will begin his appointment on Sept. 1, 2018.

Waller Creek Finds a Place in the SunJune 7, 2018

Waller Creek Finds a Place in the Sun

“As Texas cities grow, natural watersheds will become urbanized. We can…. improve our understanding of the complex interactions among hydrologic systems, ecosystems, and human infrastructure systems.”

Commentary: Texas Must Be Better Prepared to Battle Extreme WeatherJune 7, 2018

Commentary: Texas Must Be Better Prepared to Battle Extreme Weather

“I can tell you that real preparedness… is something that’s built into our cities, settlements, roads and infrastructure. And we are woefully unprepared for this year’s hurricane season…”

Welcome to Planet Texas 2050May 31, 2018

Welcome to Planet Texas 2050

Today is the first day of hurricane season, which makes this the right time to launch six new projects that will tackle some of the biggest challenges facing Texas.

Austin’s on the Wrong Side of the 100th MeridianMay 16, 2018

Austin’s on the Wrong Side of the 100th Meridian

The invisible line that divides the arid western part of the country from the wetter eastern half is on the move, and that has important implications for the Texas capital. “[The 2011 drought], which was historic in terms of how intense it was, may just be a taste of things to come in the future.”

Nation’s Largest-Ever Indoor Air Quality Experiment Coming to ‘UTest House’May 2, 2018

Nation’s Largest-Ever Indoor Air Quality Experiment Coming to ‘UTest House’

This summer, the country‘s largest indoor air quality and surface chemistry experiment brings leading experts to the university’s J.J. Pickle Research Campus to participate in an unprecedented initiative aimed at identifying the key causes of indoor air pollution.

More People, More Problems: UT Attempts to Address Texas’ Growing PopulationMarch 1, 2018

More People, More Problems: UT Attempts to Address Texas’ Growing Population

“In our eyes, the only way to meet this challenge is an ‘all boots on the ground’ approach of integrating data and research questions from across the disciplines… Our goal is to get to 2050 with a Texas that is economically vibrant, safe, healthy, and has enough for all who live here.”

Hidden “Rock Moisture” Possible Key to Forest Response to DroughtFebruary 26, 2018

Hidden “Rock Moisture” Possible Key to Forest Response to Drought

UT geoscientist Daniella Rempe has helped identify a new way trees get water during severe droughts: by sending roots deep down into the bedrock.

Video: UT Austin Looks to Tackle Flood Response and Prevention in TexasFebruary 20, 2018

Video: UT Austin Looks to Tackle Flood Response and Prevention in Texas

UT engineer Ben Hodges is finding ways to make roadways less likely to flood.

Cutting EPA Indoor Air Pollution Research Will Cost Money and LivesFebruary 20, 2018

Cutting EPA Indoor Air Pollution Research Will Cost Money and Lives

The Trump administration’s 2019 budget proposal reduces EPA funding by 23 percent. Lost in the noise was an even deeper gutting of several individual research and management programs at the EPA, which, if successful, will have great negative impacts on human health and productivity. Planet Texas 2050 researcher and indoor air quality expert Richard Corsi, Ph.D., explains.

Ask Me Anything: Preventing Population-Related DisastersFebruary 16, 2018

Ask Me Anything: Preventing Population-Related Disasters

Members of the Planet Texas 2050 research team kicked off the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) 2018 Annual Conference with their first Reddit AMA.

Planet Texas 2050 LaunchJanuary 18, 2018

Planet Texas 2050 Launch

This past October, I wrote to tell you that UT’s first Bridging Barriers research grand challenge would be Planet Texas 2050.

Future of Texas Is Focus of New Research ChallengeOctober 18, 2017

Future of Texas Is Focus of New Research Challenge

Extreme weather events, population growth and aging infrastructure are common challenges Texas shares with the nation and world.

Discovery Across DisciplinesMay 4, 2017

Discovery Across Disciplines

The Bridging Barriers initiative is challenging researchers from different disciplines to find intersecting goals and work together to solve the world’s most pressing problems.

‘Bridging Barriers’ Initiative Asks Researchers to Answer ‘Toughest Questions of our Generation’October 5, 2016

‘Bridging Barriers’ Initiative Asks Researchers to Answer ‘Toughest Questions of our Generation’

“We’re not trying to solve as many problems as we can. We’re trying to solve one very big problem very well.”

Water for Texas Conference 2019January 23, 20198:00amAT&T Executive Education and Conference Center

Water for Texas Conference 2019

The 2019 Water for Texas conference will be held at the AT&T Executive Education & Conference Center in Austin, Texas. The conference will begin with a Welcome Reception, followed by a day and a half of educational sessions. All meals, daily coffee, and snack breaks on January 24 and 25 are included in the registration fee.
Can We Leave it All Behind?October 19, 2018

Can We Leave it All Behind?

Not all past civilizations vanished died when the climate changed — they moved. But could we do the same, and where would we go?

After Harvey, Texas Must Build Preparedness into Everything We Do  — TogetherAugust 22, 2018

After Harvey, Texas Must Build Preparedness into Everything We Do  — Together

Real hurricane preparedness — the kind that not only saves lives but also preserves livelihoods — is something that’s built into our cities, settlements, roads, and infrastructure.

Addressing the Interconnected Issues of Energy SprawlAugust 22, 2018

Addressing the Interconnected Issues of Energy Sprawl

We live in an energy intensive society. Quality of life and quality of our communities depend on access to energy.

Extreme Summer: Speaking the Many Languages of Climate ChangeJuly 9, 2018

Extreme Summer: Speaking the Many Languages of Climate Change

The dominant languages of climate change have been scientific, technological and economic, but art and literature get to the root of the beliefs and values that shape human behavior.

Something’s in Our AirJune 25, 2018

Something’s in Our Air

Texas’s changing future means the air we breathe in our homes could change as well.

How Much Water Is in Texas?June 15, 2018

How Much Water Is in Texas?

June 17th is World Day to Combat Desertification and Drought, but that could be most days in parts of Texas and the southwestern U.S.

Welcome to Planet Texas 2050May 31, 2018

Welcome to Planet Texas 2050

Today is the first day of hurricane season, which makes this the right time to launch six new projects that will tackle some of the biggest challenges facing Texas.

Our World Is Changing. Our Water Infrastructure Should, Too.October 29, 2018

Our World Is Changing. Our Water Infrastructure Should, Too.

We need a more nimble and nuanced approach to urban water management, and not only because of climate change and growing urban populations, but because many communities urgently need to address failing infrastructure systems.

Sustainability Brings Grad Students TogetherOctober 18, 2018

Sustainability Brings Grad Students Together

Planet Texas 2050 researcher Steven Richter, from the School of Architecture, joined graduate students from around campus in October for Sustainability Week. His work is part of the Texas Metro Observatory. “What does urbanization mean across Texas? We are looking at interdisciplinary questions, like how socio-economic patterns or changes in the built environment affect municipal water or energy use across the state.”

After Harvey, Texans Must Build Preparedness into Everything We DoJuly 1, 2018

After Harvey, Texans Must Build Preparedness into Everything We Do

“Demographers expect Texas’s population to double by 2050. To accommodate that growth, existing cities will be forced to increase density in their urban cores, spread out, or a combination of both.”

Richard Corsi Named Engineering Dean at Portland State UniversityJune 12, 2018

Richard Corsi Named Engineering Dean at Portland State University

Planet Texas 2050 lead researcher has been named the next dean of Portland State University’s Maseeh College of Engineering and Computer Science. He will begin his appointment on Sept. 1, 2018.

Waller Creek Finds a Place in the SunJune 7, 2018

Waller Creek Finds a Place in the Sun

“As Texas cities grow, natural watersheds will become urbanized. We can…. improve our understanding of the complex interactions among hydrologic systems, ecosystems, and human infrastructure systems.”

Commentary: Texas Must Be Better Prepared to Battle Extreme WeatherJune 7, 2018

Commentary: Texas Must Be Better Prepared to Battle Extreme Weather

“I can tell you that real preparedness… is something that’s built into our cities, settlements, roads and infrastructure. And we are woefully unprepared for this year’s hurricane season…”

Austin’s on the Wrong Side of the 100th MeridianMay 16, 2018

Austin’s on the Wrong Side of the 100th Meridian

The invisible line that divides the arid western part of the country from the wetter eastern half is on the move, and that has important implications for the Texas capital. “[The 2011 drought], which was historic in terms of how intense it was, may just be a taste of things to come in the future.”

Nation’s Largest-Ever Indoor Air Quality Experiment Coming to ‘UTest House’May 2, 2018

Nation’s Largest-Ever Indoor Air Quality Experiment Coming to ‘UTest House’

This summer, the country‘s largest indoor air quality and surface chemistry experiment brings leading experts to the university’s J.J. Pickle Research Campus to participate in an unprecedented initiative aimed at identifying the key causes of indoor air pollution.

More People, More Problems: UT Attempts to Address Texas’ Growing PopulationMarch 1, 2018

More People, More Problems: UT Attempts to Address Texas’ Growing Population

“In our eyes, the only way to meet this challenge is an ‘all boots on the ground’ approach of integrating data and research questions from across the disciplines… Our goal is to get to 2050 with a Texas that is economically vibrant, safe, healthy, and has enough for all who live here.”

Hidden “Rock Moisture” Possible Key to Forest Response to DroughtFebruary 26, 2018

Hidden “Rock Moisture” Possible Key to Forest Response to Drought

UT geoscientist Daniella Rempe has helped identify a new way trees get water during severe droughts: by sending roots deep down into the bedrock.

Video: UT Austin Looks to Tackle Flood Response and Prevention in TexasFebruary 20, 2018

Video: UT Austin Looks to Tackle Flood Response and Prevention in Texas

UT engineer Ben Hodges is finding ways to make roadways less likely to flood.

Cutting EPA Indoor Air Pollution Research Will Cost Money and LivesFebruary 20, 2018

Cutting EPA Indoor Air Pollution Research Will Cost Money and Lives

The Trump administration’s 2019 budget proposal reduces EPA funding by 23 percent. Lost in the noise was an even deeper gutting of several individual research and management programs at the EPA, which, if successful, will have great negative impacts on human health and productivity. Planet Texas 2050 researcher and indoor air quality expert Richard Corsi, Ph.D., explains.

Ask Me Anything: Preventing Population-Related DisastersFebruary 16, 2018

Ask Me Anything: Preventing Population-Related Disasters

Members of the Planet Texas 2050 research team kicked off the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) 2018 Annual Conference with their first Reddit AMA.

Planet Texas 2050 LaunchJanuary 18, 2018

Announcing Launch of Planet Texas 2050

This past October, I wrote to tell you that UT’s first Bridging Barriers research grand challenge would be Planet Texas 2050.

Future of Texas Is Focus of New Research ChallengeOctober 18, 2017

Future of Texas Is Focus of New Research Challenge

Extreme weather events, population growth and aging infrastructure are common challenges Texas shares with the nation and world.

Discovery Across DisciplinesMay 4, 2017

Discovery Across Disciplines

The Bridging Barriers initiative is challenging researchers from different disciplines to find intersecting goals and work together to solve the world’s most pressing problems.

‘Bridging Barriers’ Initiative Asks Researchers to Answer ‘Toughest Questions of our Generation’October 5, 2016

‘Bridging Barriers’ Initiative Asks Researchers to Answer ‘Toughest Questions of our Generation’

“We’re not trying to solve as many problems as we can. We’re trying to solve one very big problem very well.”

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